A weekend in La Clape – Part 2: Highlights from the Gerard Bertrand portfolio

dsc_0242.jpgSo despite being led astray by my SatNav and taking a detour through every village in the Languedoc, eventually we made it to Chateau l’Hospitalet. Never mind that we were two hours later than anticipated, arriving long after the sun had gone down.

Last time I visited Chateau l’Hospitalet, the weather was practically inhospitable. A relentless, icy wind blew for the length of the weekend, worsened by bouts of driving rain that made any trip into the outdoors about as attractive as shopping on Oxford Street on a Saturday afternoon.

Thankfully this year the conditions were much more becoming of southern France. On Saturday morning we awoke to relative tranquillity. No gale-force winds or sideways rain. Which is a good thing for an event centred on vine pruning and watching a fluffy brown dog sniff out truffles.

Anyway. The dogs I can discuss in another post. Today we’re here to discuss the primary reason for visiting Gerard Bertrand’s flagship estate: his portfolio of fine wine.

Just prior to lunch on a Saturday morning we sat down for a tasting of 10 wines from the Gerard Bertrand portfolio representing a broad cross-section of properties and styles in the region. The intention was to showcase the release of new vintages, 2014 for the white wines and 2013 for the red wines. Here are my thoughts. The first four wines are white (in green text), the other six are red wines (in red text).

Chateau La Sauvageonne Grand Vin 2014
A blend of grenache blanc, vermentino and viognier. Medium lemon in colour with stone fruits, peaches and marmalade on the nose, as well as vanilla. In the mouth, it has a lush feel with further stone fruits and a creamy quality, with an element of minerality to balance things. Quite forward on the nose but very enjoyable.

Chateau l’Hospitalet Grand Vin 2014
A blend of roussanne, vermentino, viognier and bourboulenc. More restrained on the nose when compared with the Sauvageonne blanc. This is very clearly a roussane/viognier blend given its aroma, with citrus, stone fruits and hints of oak coming through. Medium body, it offers up further stone fruits in the mouth and has a long finish. Very good now but will clearly improve.

Aigle Royal Chardonnay Limoux 2014
A 100% chardonnay originating from Roquetaillade, the fermentation begins in vat and is then transferred to new barrels at the mid-fermentation stage. Light lemon in colour, this wine has restrained aromas of peaches, citrus and oak. With a creamy mouthfeel due to barrel fermentation, this wine is delicate on the one hand but with substantial power in the background. Very good.

Cigalus IGP Aude Hauterive 2014
A blend of chardonnay, viognier and sauvignon blanc from Bizanet. This comes from a biodynamic vineyard where 70% of the wine is fermented in new barrels and 30% in steel vats. Malolactic fermentation is performed on some of the barrels. This wine has beautiful aromas of peaches, cream, vanilla and marmalade, with a distinct banana characteristic as well. In the mouth, further citrus and peaches come through. Very, very good.

Chateau La Sauvageonne Grand Vin 2013
A blend of grenache, syrah, mourvedre and carignan. Deep ruby red with black fruits (blackberries, plums, black cherries, blueberries) on the nose, with hints of strawberries and black currants. On the palate there are more black fruits with a good backbone of tannin and acidity. This is a classic grenache/syrah blend with good fruit and is not too overpowering. Good.

Chateau l’Hospitalet Grand Vin 2013
Always a favourite of mine, the 2013 vintage of Chateau l’Hospitalet’s Grand Vin — or any other Languedoc wine for that matter — is truly worth seeking out. A blend of syrah, grenache and mourvedre, this wine is aged in new barrels for 12 months with periodic stirring of the lees. This wine is deep in colour with dense aromas of black fruits. Still young and restrained, it is possible to pick up the hallmarks of this style: black fruit, garrigue, herbs and a distinct aroma of olives. With good acidity and tannin, this wine will age well. Very, very good.

Chateau de Villemajou Grand Vin 2013
Another favourite, this is a blend consisting of carignan, syrah, grenache and mourvedre where the carignan and syrah are vinified in whole bunches with carbonic maceration for 10 to 18 days, while the grenache and mourvedre are vinified in the traditional manner after de-stemming, with maceration of 15 to 20 days. Deep ruby red in colour, this has beautiful aromas of black fruits, blueberries, black currants, cherries and violets. in the mouth there is yet more black fruit with undertones of red fruits. This is very clearly a Corbieres wine with quite a bit of power without being heavy. Very, very good.

Aigle Royal Pinot Noir 2013
A 100% pinot noir wine from Roquetaillade, the grapes are de-stemmed completely before fermentation, with the wine ages in French oak for 10 to 12 months, where it undergoes malolactic fermentation. Light rub red in colour and offering up vibrant aromas of red berries, spices and vanilla, as well as strawberries and red currants. This has a  delicate feel in the mouth, with good acidity and a tannic backbone to give it ageing potential. Very good.

Cigalus Aude Hautervie Rouge 2013
A blend of an incredible seven different grapes (cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, merlot, syrah, grenache, carignan and caladoc), this comes from a biodynamic vineyard where the syrah and carignan are vinified separately in whole bunches, while the rest of the grapes are de-stemmed and vinified in what they describe as the traditional way. A deep, dark ruby red colour, this has an intense, brooding nose of black fruits (prunes, plums, black currants), while in the mouth it offers of strong acidity and tannin with more layers of complex black fruits and a dash of vanilla. Full bodied, this is a powerful wine with plenty of life ahead of it. Very, very good.

Le Viala Minervois La Liviniere 2013
A blend of syrah, grenache and carignan, Le Viala comes from a small parcel of land at Chateau Laville Bertrous. The grapes are thoroughly sorted prior to fermentation, with the carignan and syrah transferred to the vats in whole bunches where they undergo carbonic maceration, while the grenache is de-stemmed and left for a traditional maceration for three weeks. Deep ruby red, this has complex aromas of garrigue, olives, herbs and black fruits. It is very much a Minervois, but of a fine quality, with black fruits and solid acidity in the mouth. It’s quite weighty but well-rounded with plenty of tannins to give it a long life. Very, very good and among the finer wines of the region.

 

 

 

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M&S re-imagines the Oregon Treaty

meyer-vineyards-2Just when you thought Canada has finally established itself on the global wine map, something crops up that makes it abundantly clear that there is still a long way to go.

As the price tag in the photo shows, it seems that not even Marks & Spencer is aware that Canada is a sovereign wine-producing nation – even though Canadian wine is nothing new for the retailer.

Despite a bottle that clearly states the wine’s origins — British Columbia, Canada — someone in the M&S machine decided to print a run of shelf tags that declare this Meyer Family Vineyards Pinot Noir as a product of the USA.

Perhaps the powers-that-be at M&S have decided that the Oregon Treaty of 1846 had a more disastrous outcome for the British, placing the Canada-USA border much further north than its current path along the 49th parallel.

How else could they have confused a wine from Canada’s Okanagan Valley  as being from the USA?

The wine in question is Meyer Family Vineyards Pinot Noir Oakanagan Valley 2014, which sells for £18.99 per bottle here in the UK.

Back in September this year when I visited the Meyer Family Vineyards winery in Okanagan Falls, British Columbia, it was, as far as I could tell, still on the Canadian side of the border. Unless something went drastically wrong between then and now, I believe this is still the case. It’s also fairly unlikely that the Americans mounted an opportunistic land grab during the recent election campaign.

wpid-dsc_0068.jpgView from the Meyer tasting room

Along with several other wines, I was able to taste the 2013 vintage of the Meyer Family Vineyards Okanagan Valley Pinot Noir, their entry-level version of this varietal wine. I can’t say for sure if the wine made for Marks & Spencer is made in the same way as the one sold in their home market, but these were my observations:

Meyer Family Vineyards Okanagan Valley Pinot Noir 2014

On the nose it has aromas of red berries, boiled sweets, forest floor and mushrooms along with brambly, spicy notes. Aged in older barrels with no new oak, this has plenty of red berries on palate with medium acidity. It is not one bit astringent, which is a characteristic that can plagues other entry-level pinots. Very enjoyable. — September 2015

Tasted: The Outsiders of Languedoc

wpid-dsc_0689.jpgWhen I first heard of the group of wine producers known as The Outsiders, I had visions that they were a band of outcasts akin to those conjured up by SE Hinton or even Camus.

I was clearly over-romanticising. The Outsiders in this case are anything but a band of misfits and societal outcasts. Instead, they’re a group of winemakers. All of them upstanding citizens. At least as far as I could surmise.

This is a group of winemakers operating in Languedoc-Roussillon who come from all over the world and from a variety of walks of life but, crucially, are not native to the region. What they have in common is their active decision to settle in Languedoc-Roussillon to make wine.

There are times when calling oneself an outsider is something to embrace. When it comes to the bureaucratic labyrinth that is the regulatory framework of the French appellation system, being an outsider is often seen as a disadvantage. The stubbornness of the appellation system is no place for an iconoclast, where decades of tradition are preferred over ‘frivolous’ notions of commercial viability, free enterprise and experimentation. Despite this, it seems that these Outsiders have been able to overcome, or embrace, the bureaucratic machine and carve out a niche for themselves.

As part of their effort to market their wares to UK merchants, this group of international winemakers (they come from all over the world, from America and Australia to the United Kingdom, Switzerland and yes, within France itself) hosted a small tasting in London back in early May.

Looking back on my rather shabby notes, I can see clear evidence that this was a decent tasting despite having experienced the onset of a head cold that same morning. First, I managed to write notes against every wine on the list, a clear sign that I neither grew bored with the wines, nor daunted by their numbers. Second, the greasy fingerprints left behind on the paper suggest that the spread of charcuterie and cheese on offer was more than adequate. Of course, as the photo below shows, reading the chicken scrawl that is my actual notes does present a bit of a challenge:

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As a tasting that included a broad range of wines from across the Languedoc region, it is hard to make generalisations or make sweeping statements about the producers. Quality levels were high, but there were obvious differences among the producers in terms of what they are trying to achieve. Some are aiming for affordable, accessible wines, while others are aiming for something a little more profound. In other words, you won’t be having any flashbacks to that time you bought vin en vrac from what looked like a petrol pump behind a dusty shed.

If I’d had the foresight to, say, scribble down scores for each of the wines I tasted, I’d have a much easier time selecting my favourites from this group. But where is the fun in that?

Anyway, enough of my digressions. Here are my highlights from a good bunch of wines. Some of these winemakers are still seeking distribution here in the UK, while some are available to buy from various merchants and supermarkets, although I’ll be darned if I can remember which ones.

Chateau Rives-Blanques Occitania Mauzac Limoux 2013

A still white wine made from the mauzac grape, this is a rich wine that is matured in oak and offers up stone fruit flavours. This is a delicious wine that has a lot of heft and fruit behind it while still being dry

Domaine Sainte Rose Le Pinacle 2012

There is quite a lot to like about all of the wines of Domaine Sainte Rose, but if I had to narrow down my choice to just one, it would be Le Pinacle 2012. Consisting of 95% syrah and a 5% dash of viognier, this has the style of Cote Rotie with a lush palate and medium body. It has an attractive earthy character backed up by red fruits and the potential for a long life.

Chateau d’Angles Grand Vin Red 2010

La Clape is one of the great wine regions of southern France and this producer has brought some Bordelais swagger — complete with red trousers — to the area. The grand vin is a real pleaser, with a high level of mourvedre in the blend to make a deeper, bigger wine that has an attractive balance of fruit and earthy flavours.

Chateau Beauregard Mirouze Fiare 2010

I might be at risk of selecting too many ‘top’ wines from this tasting, but this was among the standouts from Chateau Beauregard Mirouze. With 18 months of barrel age, this displayed dark fruits (prunes and raisins) and had a deep, broody, earthy, chocolatey character to it. In many ways it was sunshine in a glass.

Domaine Saint Hilaire The Silk Chardonnay IGP Pays d’Oc2012

In the past I was never a big fan of chardonnay from the south of France. At times it seemed flabby, overripe and lacking any real character or complexity. But this is something different. It could very well be a competitor to decent Burgundy, having a healthy but not excessive oak treatment, not to mention a real elegance and finesse about it. Close your eyes and you think you’re drinking something from the Cote de Beaune or even the Cote d’Or.

Domaine La Madura Grand Vin Blanc 2014

This was a delight, a barrel-fermented, sauvignon blanc-dominant wine.Fermented and matured in older barrels, this older oak treatment is immediately noticeable on the nose, while on the palate it is rich with citrus and stone fruits, and has a long finish.

Domaine Turner Pageot La Rupture 2013

Another white wine that grabbed my attention. This was a lot like a white Bordeaux to me, made of sauvignon blanc but in a restrained style that is free from the more modern take on SB that has proliferated the market. Fresh, mineral and a good match for food. Not a whiff of cat pee to be sniffed.

Domaine Modat Le Plus Joli 2011

This is warm, spicy and very much a syrah from the south of France. With 80% syrah and the balance consisting of grenache and carignan,  this Rousillon displays licorice and nutmeg, with fine tannins and a long finish.

Chateau Saint Jacques d’Albas Le Chateau d’Albas Minervois 2012

A blend of syrah and grenache, this is aged 12 months in barrel and offers up all that is good about Minervois. It is warm, with fine tannins and a backbone of ample red fruits .

Domaine de Cebene Les Brancels Faugeres 2012

All of the wines from this producer were excellent, but Les Brancels seemed to stand out to me. This was what was described as the ‘house blend’ of syrah, grenache, mourvedre and carignan. I love the wines of Faugeres and this displayed all the characteristics that keep bring me back: warmth, earthy aromas a flavours, a good backbone of fruit and a fine complexity that pulls it all together.

Not mentioned…

Two other producers that were at the tasting but without a mention here were Le Clos du Gravillas and Domaine Le Clos du Serres. This was for no other reason except that my notes for these producers were a bit too sparse (likely because I was chatting rather than writing) for me to be able to write a recommendation.

 

 

 

 

Sticker shock: Worthy pinot noir for less than £20

wpid-dsc_0662.jpgFinding decent pinot noir for a decent price has become a nearly impossible quest that is akin to finding an affordable apartment in central London that isn’t simply a converted attic with a camp stove in the corner.

Pinot noir is one of those wines that can stop you in your tracks when you taste it. At its best, it is complex and profound, causing you to take more time to enjoy layer upon layer of flavour. At its worst, it can prompt your gag reflex.

Notoriously difficult to get right, pinot noir isn’t one of those wines that can be made in large volumes successfully. Thin-skinned, prone to rot and demanding care and attention throughout the growing season and in the winery, this is a wine that you don’t want to buy from Romania for £2 a bottle. And despite what some people might say, you probably don’t want anything from New Zealand’s Marlborough region for less than £10 a bottle these days either. Note that in California, the volume producers have steered clear of pinot noir for the most part. While Charles Shaw — AKA Two Buck Chuck — can pull off cheap chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon, among other varietal wines, they stopped short of jumping on the pinot noir bandwagon. That was a wise decision.

Where, then, do we find affordable, drinkable pinot noir? New Zealand’s Marlborough region is increasingly turning out impressive examples.

While Central Otago to the south and Martinborough to the north are coveted for the quality of their pinot, the price can often be a bit of a shocker. Marlborough, perhaps best known for its unique style of sauvignon blanc, has been producing pinot noir for quite some time. Even though they tend to be cheaper than those from Otago, they can be frustratingly acidic, one-dimensional and unappetising. Think Brancott, Oyster Bay and any other supermarket brand for that matter.

There are some great examples of Marlborough pinot, however. The likes of Dog Point and Cloudy Bay, and the better offerings from Seresin, all produce fine pinots but their per-bottle prices are north of £20 and are often closer to £30. Pegasus Bay, in the Canterbury region, also makes a great pinot noir, but again the price is around £25 per bottle.

The question is, can we find an enjoyable pinot noir with layers of complexity with a price somewhere between the forgettable supermarket brands and top-end juggernauts? I think we might.

For several months I have been visiting the Leadenhall Market location of Amathus Drinks and eyeing up its selection of wines from Marlborough’s Domaine Georges Michel with curiosity and suspicion. Curious, because it is a producer unknown to me. Suspicious, because little has been written about them in the UK.

Further suspicion comes from the price. The company’s mid-range pinot noir, Domaine Georges Michel La Reserve Pinot Noir 2010, is listed at £22.51 per bottle on the Amathus website, placing it firmly in the more expensive category of Kiwi pinot. But in the shop it is selling for £16.85. While not cheap for the everyday wine drinker on the street, if it’s good, it could be a steal.

On first pour, the wine is pale but not watery, with complex aromas of cherries, plums, currants, mushrooms, oak, brambly fruits and savoury, earthy notes. On the palate it has that classic smoothness of a well-made Kiwi pinot, with a dash of muscle while also having a great deal of French-influenced finesse. Plenty of cherries and fruit backed by more layers of savoury notes and smooth tannins. At five years old, this wine has benefited from some bottle age and is clearly made in a more Burgundian style but clearly has New Zealand as its origin.

For the price, this wine outclasses many that have cost twice as much (Cuvaison from California coming immediately to mind). It might be too early to suggest that it is in the same league as some of its more famous Marlborough neighbours, so let’s hope that the price stays put.

 

On junk science and my (former) dislike of Chilean wine

wpid-dsc_0592.jpgA quick glance at the science section of any major newspaper tells us two things. First, that there is no shortage of academics trying to find the answer to anything and everything in our observable universe. And second, that there seems to be a disproportionate number of scientists devoting countless hours, perhaps even years, to some of life’s least important issues.

Almost all of it is junk science with an agenda behind it, and this fact has been reported widely. It seems, for some reason, that the Telegraph is leading the pack when it comes to reports of junk science, perhaps because, in its endeavour to attract the most clicks and therefore higher ad revenues, it must print anything and everything.

It comes as no surprise that junk science about wine tasting appears frequently, hashing and then re-hashing the same tired topics. Case in point, this week’s round of wine tasting ‘science’ and ‘research’, as reported by the Telegraph and Harper’s Wine & Spirits. At the Telegraph, we read about how wines with lower alcohol are purported to have more flavour than those with higher alcohol. Sure, insofar as the alcohol isn’t masking the fruit and other aspects that make up the wine’s flavour profile.

Then, in Harper’s, we read that Naked Wines, the online retailer, claimed that consumers ‘prefer’ bigger, bolder wines with more alcohol. If consumers want flavour, then surely going for a wine with more alcohol is counter-intuitive? I can only conclude that something doesn’t add up here. I’m going to suggest it’s the science involved. No matter how deeply scientists study the process of wine tasting, no matter how often they might conclude that there is nothing behind it, they are clearly ignoring the fact that there is, and it’s entirely sensory and subjective.

Think of it this way: there are no scientific reviews that I know of that have debunked the science film reviews. Many of the most celebrated films ever made received bad reviews upon release — think Vertigo, Citizen Kane, Casablanca and my personal favourite, The Big Lebowski — but no one has claimed that this was because film reviewing is junk science. Nor does anyone say it when the reviews are overly positive.

On the topic of science and subjectivity, let me make a very bad segue and write about Chilean wine. It is no secret that I have an irrational intense dislike of Chilean wine. Mostly, I have found it to represent a vague middle ground in the wine world, a sort of indecisiveness, neither here nor there of flavour and complexity.

If, for example, a merlot from St Emilion represents restraint and a sense of place while a merlot from, say, California, has a reputation for being the opposite of restrained, then a Chilean merlot, by and large, will inevitably land somewhere in the middle. And the middle is not where anyone wants to be, for being in the middle really just means that you’re neither this nor that. It’s the beige minivan of wine, offering as much excitement as a night out at the library.

Except. Except there could be another way. And I might have found it, in all places, at Marks & Spencer. Look beyond the cashmere scarves and the navy blue blazers with those gaudy gold buttons and head straight for the wine aisle, where the selection is anything but stuffy. Indian sauvignon blanc? Georgian orange wine?  A crisp, white wine from Tikves in Macedonia? Check, check and check. On the Chilean front, the usual suspects make an appearance in the M&S aisles.

But what’s this hiding near the bottom of the shelf? A dry pedro ximenez from Chile’s Elqui Valley? Pedro ximenez is a white wine grape best known for growing in southern Spain, where it is turned into a sherry of the same name, often labelled PX for short. PX sherry is dark and sweet, the result of grapes that have been laid out to dry in the sun to intensify their sugar concentration.

With M&X Pedro Ximenez PX, things are rather different. The wine is dry and crisp, not sweet and unctuous. It reminded me more of a wine from the Maconnais region of France, not an oddball white wine made in Chile from an oddball grape. For somewhere in the region of £7, this wasn’t just an acceptable bottle of wine, this was one of the first Chilean wines I’d enjoyed in a long time (a recently tasted bottle of very expensive still wine made in a Champagne style notwithstanding).

Now, this isn’t a perfect wine by any means. Its price is in the lower half of the M&S product suite, so it isn’t necessarily profound or complex. It probably won’t cause any epiphanies any time soon. But it’s interesting and satisfying, something few Chilean wines have achieved for me in the past few years.

And there’s more. M&S also sells a reasonably priced wine made from Chile’s signature red wine grape, carmenere, and it, too, stopped me in my tracks. M&S CM Carmenere also hails from the Elqui Valley and, while slightly more expensive than the PX, represents good value. I expected it to be fruity and innocuous like a generic merlot might be, but instead it was so much more. Oak, spices, excellent fruit on the palate and a solid backbone all make for a bit of a surprise. So PX and CM. Who knew? Until recently I had avoided Chilean wine out of caution. But perhaps I was wrong all along. What I do know is that it had nothing to do with science.

Gruner veltliner: I still don’t get it

DSC_0189It used to be the height of fashion, but these days you’d be hard pressed to overhear anyone who doesn’t work in the wine trade ordering it at a bar or restaurant.

In fact, there was a time, not too long ago, when it was the sommelier’s darling, a grape few people outside of Austria understood that offered up refreshing wines and something different from the monotony of sauvignon blanc and chardonnay.

Then, as quickly as it ascended to popularity, the sommeliers of the world moved on to the next big thing (Assyrtiko? Torrontes? Albarino?). And so gruner veltliner fell to the wayside.

But why?

Maybe it was the name that did it. Gruner veltliner. Can anyone pronounce it? Is it ‘grooner velt-linger’, ‘grunner velt linner’ or ‘grooner velt linner’?

Then again, I can’t pronounce gewürztraminer properly either, but that doesn’t stop me buying it.

Whatever the case, the more I read about gruner veltliner, the more I feel obliged to love it. The only problem with this is that I simply don’t.

A while back I droned on about how I didn’t understand Chilean wine. What we have here is a grape-specific discussion in the same vein, a confession of my confusion when it comes to this particular example of vitis vinifera.

I drink gruner veltliner infrequently, but not by design. For instance, when I’m at a bar or restaurant and the other options by the glass consist of water sauvignon blanc from New Zealand, an over-oaked Californian chardonnay or something that was clearly incinerated by the heat of the Languedoc’s midday sun, my eye diverts to the gruner veltliner in a hopeful attempt to drink something that won’t sear my epiglottis.

Rarely does this extend to buying an entire bottle, either at a restaurant or from a shop. For the most part, it’s because gruner veltliner simply leaves me bored.

Yet there is plenty of evidence to suggest that I am missing out on something. If it was good enough to become the sommelier’s choice once upon a time, surely this is a grape worth noticing?

Jancis Robinson has described the grape as being “capable of producing very fine, full-bodied wines well capable of ageing”  that “produces very refreshing, tangy wines with a certain white pepper, dill, even gherkin character.”

The wines are spicy and interesting and in general this is because of the grape’s own intrinsic qualities because the great majority of them, unlike chardonnays, see no new oak. — Jancis Robinson

Similarly, Jamie Goode has described it as being food friendly, versatile and able to gain complexity as it ages.

So what have I been missing? Well, it seems that I haven’t exactly been on the wrong track all along. Even Jancis Robinson used to consider gruner veltliner to be a “poor second” to riesling that can lack character when it is over-cropped.

The example of gruner veltliner that I’ve been drinking is Josef Ehmoser Grüner Veltliner Hohenberg 2012. At £16.50 a bottle from Berry Bros & Rudd, this isn’t a weekday wine for the average consumer, but this bottle came to me as a sample bottle in a mixed case.

Now, this is a good gruner veltliner. Who could say it better than Berry Bros themselves?

Finely detailed with delicate, floral and white pepper/stone aromas, there’s a broad, soft, pulpy undercarriage, with salty/sweet, white peach stone flavours that echo those of Sarotto’s Bric Sassi Gavi di Gavi. Very pure, generous, with a distinctly sapid finish; one that cries out for a sea fish platter. — David Berry Green – Wine Buyer

My overly simple way of describing it is that it is floral, has some peach and apricot aromas, tastes of stone fruits (again, peaches) while also being fairly delicate, and finishes quite surprisingly dry despite giving the impression that it might be off-dry. This is definitely a seafood wine, which is to say that it almost tastes salty at times.

It’s good. Very good. And yet it hasn’t exactly made me a gruner convert just yet. In fact, it’s just made me even thirstier for a glass of sauvignon blanc or maybe a Chablis. What am I missing?