Photo post: California Zinfandel…just can’t say no

pedroncelliThere are certain wines, and wines from specific regions, that I simply can’t resist.

In this case, it’s a region: California.

More specifically: Sonoma County.

Even more specifically: Dry Creek Valley.

I bought this wine not because I know it to be incredible. The reviews for it on CellarTracker suggest it is good, but not a masterpiece. But Dry Creek is one of those areas where you can still stumble upon a winner you’d never heard of before.

So as I was impulse-shopping on my lunch break, the prospect of this being a winner was too good to pass up.

As you drive down Dry Creek Road between Healdsburg and Cloverdale, you have about as much chance of missing some vineyards if you happen to blink while you are passing by their driveways. I recall making multiple passes down that road to find some wineries. Over and over. And over.

And so this: Pedroncelli Bushnell Vineyard Zinfandel Dry Creek Valley 2011.

Now let’s hope it’s a winner.

Rosé, merlot and something from the Balkans: Better than you think

This post would have been a perfect round-up of three wines from countries competing in the FIFA World Cup were it not for the fact Bulgaria isn’t even at the event. This is what happens when you don’t actually pay attention to the sport.

So, now that I’ve got the pointless and frankly unrelated mention of the World Cup out of the way, let’s talk about wine.

Let’s start with merlot. It can divide a room. Few grape varieties find themselves on the receiving end of as much revile and hatred as merlot does.

Blame Rex Pickett Alexander Payne. Few people could be considered more responsible for the derision aimed at this grape than the man who wrote the screen adaptation of Sideways. While most of the story was centred on the wonder of pinot noir, merlot was the whipping boy. Pinot: lithe and lovely; merlot: fat and flabby.

Anyone who has sampled a merlot from California’s bad old days will understand. Overbaked, over-extracted, over-oaked and overdone – not much about it was charming. So too the chardonnays.

photo 3This is a real shame because there is no sane reason to be opposed to merlot in the same way there is no sane reason for anyone to have luposlipaphobia.

All of this rushed through my mind when I was drinking a Bulgarian merlot that I found on a shelf at Marks & Spencer. Peach Garden Merlot 2012 didn’t fill me with many expectations; Merlot fromBulgaria excites me about as much as chardonnay from California’s Central Valley.

I’m not going to say this wine knocked my socks off. It was basic, lacking in complexity and not memorable. But, for around £7, you can’t expect too much either.

A few reviews online castigate it for lacking fruit, for being thin, for being the embodiment of all those negative qualities that come with cheap merlot. But I am going to stand up and say that, for a simple, cheap wine, it isn’t that bad. It’s correct to the merlot style. It’s medium-bodied and basic, but it has the red fruit you would expect and an easy-drinking style. If you want complexity, spend more money. If you want a perfectly serviceable wine that you can pour into your gravy and sip on the sly, this one will do.

photo 1And so this brings me to another wine that gets a bad press. Rosé. As was written in these pages some time ago, rosé is one of those wines that can divide a room. This is particularly true among those people whose only experience with the wine includes the sickly sweet Blossom Hill and Echo Falls offerings, it can attract leers.

But this is summer and sometimes we not only want a crisp, cold drink, but we want something that says F-U-N.

And so rosé.

In fact: I love rosé.

Recently I was sent a sample bottle of Gerard Bertrand Gris Blanc 2013. I drank it over two warm evenings.

Many rosés from the south of France are brimming with the pleasant aroma of strawberries and cream with a dry palate that often pairs well with seafood. This one delivers exactly this, although it seems less full-on with the red berry notes than other wines of its type. This one is particularly crisp and a little bit more like a typical white wine, complete with a spritz and a good deal of minerality. For a wine in the region of £8 to £10, this is well worth a look, although it doesn’t seem widely available in the UK just yet.

photo 5Now, moving back to the Balkans.

Croatia might be best known at the moment for its football team’s penchant for nudity, but perhaps it should be better known for its wine.

When I was a teenager, I knew Croatia as a war-torn land that didn’t seem to be a part of the world where anyone would want to do much of anything. I was only a teenager, after all, and the Balkan war was in full swing.

But today, it does wine. It does wine quite well in fact. I could have chosen to feature a wine from any number of merchants, but my own laziness has brought me back to Marks & Spencer, thanks in part to  spate of shopping sprees there on recent lunch breaks.

We have here a bottle of M&S Golden Valley Grasevina 2012. Grasevina is, apparently, the most widely planted white grape in Croatia and offers up fresh, intense flavours backed up by a good dose of fruit and just the right amount of acidity. There is plenty of citrus and tropical fruit here, and this would be good for shellfish. Definitely worth seeking out if your usual choice for wine is a sauvignon blanc or Bourgogne blanc. And I hear their football team is better than Bulgaria’s.

 

 

 

A reader offer you say? Yes, a reader offer: IWC gold medal tasting

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So the other day the IWC asked me if I would kindly spread the word about their upcoming tasting event for gold medal-winning wines and I thought, why not?

As you might recall, back in November the IWC allowed me to attend one of their judging days and I have been worried ever since not all bothered by the fact that I cocked up their results a little bit. As a consummate professional, I blamed it on the fact they made me taste interminable flights of rough-and-ready Rioja and crisp New Zealand sauvignon blanc, rather than my untrained palate.

Now you can decide yourself if I got it right (even though there’s actually no way of knowing which Riojas I judged), rather than take a chance by buying one of those award-emblazoned wines during your next trip to the supermarket.

Not wanting this to read like an advertisement or anyone to be under the impression that I take inducements, the only reason I agreed to do this is because I’ve always been treated kindly by the IWC and its PR team.

So, why not? Here are the details:

The International Wine Challenge is hosting an event that it calls A Taste of Gold on Thursday 26 June. The tasting takes place between 6pm and 9pm at Lindley Hall, The Royal Horticultural Halls, London.

This an annual event featuring IWC gold medal-winning wine and sake, and it is only for producers who have won a gold medal in the current challenge year. They are also allowed to show a selection of other IWC medal winning-wines and sakes from their portfolio, so I apologise in advance if you stumble across the occcasional bronze medal winner (as an aside, a judge once told me that giving a wine ‘commended’ or even bronze medal status is akin to telling the winemaker that it’s crap, but that’s just one person’s opinion).

Tickets for the event are normally £20 but you can get £5 off if you use the promotional code ‘GRAPENUT’. (Note the cute reference to the name of my blog.)

Full disclosure: The IWC has offered me two free tickets to this event. In the spirit of good ethics (and if I actually accept the tickets) I will donate their face value to a yet-to-be-determined charity. Feel free to recommend a charity in the comments section on this page.

And don’t worry, you won’t be stuck in a room full of socially awkward punters and the squirrely folk who run the wineries. The top brass of the IWC will be there too (Tim Atkin, Oz Clarke, Charles Metcalfe, etc).

So, if you have a bone to pick about the medal-winning wines, you’ll be able to hold the senior judges to account.

All the details are here: http://goldmedal.internationalwinechallenge.com/